Weekly Photo Challenge: Entrance (into a new life?)

bride and groon walking with bicycleI took this photo in Doagh Famine Village in County Donegal, Ireland. The image was pretty powerful and I felt the message was that this couple will survive or die fighting. Wouldn’t you love to hear their story?

Weekly Photo Challenge: Entrance (to the other side)

entrance to cemetary in IrelandVisiting cemeteries in Ireland was as normal as visiting churches, pubs and gift shops. The history shared on the gravestones made you wonder about the babies and parents that died on the same day. Or the stones that included a poem, love story or gave location of where the person traveled.

Cemeteries are well-kept, the grass is trimmed and flowers are blooming. The Irish dead are revered today, as they were decades ago.

Burke gravestone in irelandThe family tells it’s story on the gravestone. This cemetery is where my mother’s family was buried. It was a very special afternoon …

gravestone————————-

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Entrance (to an abandoned Irish cottage)

Entrance to an Irish HomesteadIn Ireland, the countryside is littered with abandoned cottages. These buildings once housed entire families for generations but now are crumbling eyesores.

In the boom years, the Irish build new houses on their property and left these to erode with the seasons. Unfortunately, with the decline of each cottage, we lose a bit of history. The family that lived on the land may have moved to better accommodations but the extended family is left without a story.

Imagine – for a moment – that each county – clan – or family worked to restore a cottage or two. Now image working with organizations – bicycle groups, walkers, Study Abroad Students, marathoners, quilters, photographers, book groups, historians (to name a few) who might want to visit the cottages and learn the history of the family, village, community, churches, etc.

Bus tours could roam from county to county to visit the churches and cottages. Gift shops, restaurants, businesses and such could grow again with a focus on Ireland.

I say – Go for it – then send me an invite and I’ll be there!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Entrance (to an Irish Cottage)

entrance to cottageEntrance to an Irish Cottage at Doagh Famine Village in County Donegal.
Last summer, my sister and I went to this museum located in the northern tip of Ireland in the Dingle Peninsula. . What a great history I received by attending!

—————-

Doagh Famine Village 2011: “Living on the Edge”:

Overview
The Famine Village tells the story of a family and community living on the edge and surviving, from the Famine of the 1840s to the present time.

Comments from Marge: This museum is a MUST see! You will learn so much and walk away with insight and awareness that makes the rest of the visit fall into place!

If you go – be sure to write and tell me about it!

————–

Weekly Photos Challenge: Entrance

Took a lovely tour inside Cabra Castle in Ireland last year. I felt like a queen sitting on these steps!

woman sitting on red carpetCabra Castle is less than an hours drive from Dublin Airport, and is the perfect location for a weekend break in an Irish castle. The castle is situated in the wonderful County of Cavan, which features a variety of activities and places to visit.

entrance to Cabra Castle in County Cavan Ireland

History

The Two Cabra Castles, and the Pratt Family
(1699 – 1964)

The original Cabra Castle, the ruins of which still stand on high ground above the Wishing Well – not far from Cromwell’s Bridge, was situated to the west of the Kingscourt – Carrickmacross Road.

The Castle and the land surrounding it is believed to have belonged to the O’Reilly Family until it was confiscated in the mid 17th century by Cromwell’s orders and given to Colonel Thomas Cooch. Colonel T. Cooch was born in Donegal in 1632 and was the grandson of Sir Thomas Cooch K.C. Sir Thomas Cooch K.C. had migrated to Ireland very early in the 17th century and was given a grant of 1,000 acres in Donegal by James 1.

Colonel Thomas Cooch, first owner of Cabra Estate, married Elizabeth Mervyn, sister of Audley Mervyn (Speaker of the Irish House of Commons), and they had an only daughter and heiress, Elizabeth. >>Read More