Weekly Photo Challenge: Unfocused

When I was visiting Ireland, I visited several museums and read about the famine and mass emigration that happened due to a variety of reasons. This slide below is pretty unfocused but the next slide explains in sad detail some of the ugly truth…
Ireland, 1847- exports were enough to feed 4x the population of Ireland
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Ireland exports to England in 1847

And one more, a tad unfocused item found in another Irish museum.

Irish Coffin Ships
Coffin ships: Setting sail in 1846/7

Up to the middle 1840s, ships from Northern Europe sailed only in spring and summer to ensure they avoided ice and bad weather on their transatlantic voyage.

But in 1846, the most severe winter in living memory, immigration ships continued to sail from Ireland. Most headed southwest, to US ports. Alarmed at the level of destitution and illness arriving with these vessels, the US Congress quickly passed two new Passenger Acts in order to make the voyage even more expensive. That following March, the minimum fare to New York rose to £7, an amount way beyond the majority of families facing starvation in Ireland. Even so, all tickets had been sold by the middle of April.
Found on Irish Geology

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Created for: dailypost.wordpress.com/2012/05/04/weekly-photo-challenge-unfocused/

If You’re Irish …

My mom was Irish so we grew up singing lots of Irish songs. We sang them pretty loud to cover the fact that maybe we didn’t know all the words or that we couldn’t carry a tune but we sang them with pride!

I remember this one clearly and enjoy singing it all these years later … ‘Twould be lovely if my mom were here to sing it with me…

If you’re Irish come into the parlour
There’s a welcome there for you
If your name is Timothy or Pat
So long as you come from Ireland
There’s a welcome on the mat
If You come from the Mountains of Mourne
Or Killarney’s lakes so blue
We’ll sing you a song and we’ll make a fuss
Whoever you are you are one of us
If you’re Irish, this is the place for you

And this was pretty special too. I grew up singing this song – ever heard it before? It’s called “That’s how you spell Ireland!”

I is for the Irish in your bonnie eyes my dear
R is right for when you’re right, you have no cause to fear
E is for Eileen, my mother’s name I mean and
L is for the love I have for that sweet colleen
A is for the angels who are watching over you
N is never fear, keep smiling through
D is for your daddy’s lesson that I pray will be a blessing

And that how I spell, Ireland

Green river in Chicago to celebrate St Pattys Day

Green river in Chicago to celebrate St Pattys Day
Green river in Chicago to celebrate St Patty's Day

And a very special Irish Blessing to you all:

May the roads rise to meet you,
May the winds be always at your back,
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
The rains fall soft upon your fields,
And until we meet again
May God hold you in the hollow of his hand.”

Weekly Photo Challenge: Windows

A menu and a view in Ireland!a dining room window in ireland

Weekly Photo Challenge: Textured

Irish HomesteadNotice the varied texture on this old Irish Homestead in County Cavan. The wrinkles, crinkles, tears and ripples make this building burst with texture. I hope you enjoy it!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Entrance (into a new life?)

bride and groon walking with bicycleI took this photo in Doagh Famine Village in County Donegal, Ireland. The image was pretty powerful and I felt the message was that this couple will survive or die fighting. Wouldn’t you love to hear their story?

Weekly Photo Challenge: Entrance (to the other side)

entrance to cemetary in IrelandVisiting cemeteries in Ireland was as normal as visiting churches, pubs and gift shops. The history shared on the gravestones made you wonder about the babies and parents that died on the same day. Or the stones that included a poem, love story or gave location of where the person traveled.

Cemeteries are well-kept, the grass is trimmed and flowers are blooming. The Irish dead are revered today, as they were decades ago.

Burke gravestone in irelandThe family tells it’s story on the gravestone. This cemetery is where my mother’s family was buried. It was a very special afternoon …

gravestone————————-

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Entrance (to an abandoned Irish cottage)

Entrance to an Irish HomesteadIn Ireland, the countryside is littered with abandoned cottages. These buildings once housed entire families for generations but now are crumbling eyesores.

In the boom years, the Irish build new houses on their property and left these to erode with the seasons. Unfortunately, with the decline of each cottage, we lose a bit of history. The family that lived on the land may have moved to better accommodations but the extended family is left without a story.

Imagine – for a moment – that each county – clan – or family worked to restore a cottage or two. Now image working with organizations – bicycle groups, walkers, Study Abroad Students, marathoners, quilters, photographers, book groups, historians (to name a few) who might want to visit the cottages and learn the history of the family, village, community, churches, etc.

Bus tours could roam from county to county to visit the churches and cottages. Gift shops, restaurants, businesses and such could grow again with a focus on Ireland.

I say – Go for it – then send me an invite and I’ll be there!